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fulfillment

Behavior, change, coaching, community, Decision making, fulfillment, Literacy, Risk, Uncategorized

In the Interest of Civility . . . Try this

What causes tunnel vision?

We encourage people, especially students, to focus on what is important to them, yet we must keep an open mind.

As an instructor of all ages–children and adults–I wonder what causes people to continue in a belief even when evidence appears to refute their point of view.

Here is my opinion of what happens from my observations:

·      No one likes to be corrected or made to be wrong. It puts one on the defensive and creates discomfort, especially if the correction is done in a group.

·      Holding to an idea is like a security blanket; it’s familiar. The idea holds comfort for us. In order to shift an opinion, one has to feel safe. The internal dialogue may go like this, “If I was wrong about that, what else could I be wrong about?” It creates insecurity.

·      A change could create internal conflict, and the person thinks, “I avoid conflict at all costs!” Typically risk averse of non-confrontational styles.

·      One can feel manipulated if s/he changes one’s mind.

·      People who want to control everything may have difficulty with an open mind. Their thoughts my fly away.

·      Wishful or magical thinking enters the idea. Much like children who discover who Santa Claus really is, the wishful thinking aspect can continue the illusion.

·      One’s identity is tied to the belief. An idea or point of view may become vulnerable if information sheds new light on it.

Why is this discussion important?

To make mistakes is essential to learning. However, our American culture doesn’t allow much room for that—we’re off seeking the “right” answer. That’s why our educational system needs refurbishing. More question asking and less answer teaching to the test will open students’ minds.

I recommend the following: rather than combat these styles of thinking, it may be helpful to shift our perception and acknowledge that no one needs to be right; we may just need to be different. This line of thinking only works when danger or threats are removed from the situation. Unfortunately, an immediate turn to violence is all some people have been raised to know. Here is where teaching critical thinking in school is important. Also, real debate is essential to understand evidence and facts.

Encourage students to participate in debates based on documentable research from multiple sources. Encourage discussions at the dinner table or among friends even if you’re uncomfortable. We can all continue to learn. Be sure to lay out ground rules before you begin; for example, no name-calling or swearing.

Find out how they reached their conclusion. You will learn a lot about how the speaker thinks in this process, and that will improve overall communication. We could all benefit from better listeners.

Delivery of the information is also important. We must remove judgment from the topic and come to a logical conclusion based on the research posed. This is difficult and is a learned behavior. Be patient. Good luck, and let’s all communicate to better understand each other. MC

 

business coaching, Emotional Intelligence 2.0, fulfillment, Value, Workplace

A take on the correlation between coaching and high performance . . .

x

This is a question often asked by people who do not have a coaching experience. As we learn easily from examples, my analogy for the relationship between coaching is with sports figures, Olympians, and fitness gurus. Sure, they can train by themselves. The coach is an assurance policy they will produce the best outcome from an objective perspective. Performance progress is about improvement and advancement from the last episode. The coach is the witness and expert to call out what needs improvement and what is excellent. For example, the coach may demonstrate technique, yet may not be scoring a 10 on their own style. They are experienced and studied to know without being the best athlete themselves.

The role of the coach:

  • The coach is a witness and sounding board.
  • A coach encourages and inspires the pupil to keep moving forward.
  • A coach questions and promotes thought into action.
  • A coach challenges the pupil beyond self-limiting beliefs.

Years of research and interaction with clients show me the top five issues a coach responds to regarding a client’s performance at work and on a personal level—

  1. Belief
  2. Environment
  3. Fear factor
    1. Imposter syndrome Smartest person in room
      1. Prove to oneself they are worthy
    2. Procrastination
      1. Fear-based behavior
      2. Don’t want to make a bad decision
        1. Self-Victimization
        2. Steeped in criticism
      3. FOMO—Fear of Missing Out
        1. Too much emphasis on what others think about oneself.
        2. Fear of left behind, abandonment
      4. Tolerances
        1. Sap energy
        2. Distractions
      5. Temperament
        1. Persistent
        2. Optimistic v pessimistic
        3. Self-definitions of achievement and success

These manifest in negative or positive self-talk and body language. They can be culprits for self-sabotage.

 

The coach holds up a mirror to the client so he/she can see themselves for who they really are in a safe space. No criticism only room for improvement and powerful questions that bring issues to the foreground. Course corrections are made with the full commitment of the client; the client knows that coach has his/her best interest always. The trust must be established. The relationship is sacred and promotes growth, understanding, and fulfillment on one’s own terms.

How does your work environment, even as a solopreneur, create a high-performance impetus for you to thrive?*

Why is this topic so critical?

The ultimate trust bondWe put our lives in their hands!

This is how we begin to build an award-winning culture in the workplace and at home. That will be our next entry.

*When you send me an email with a response, you will receive a complimentary 30-minute coaching session for any issue you desire. Eager to serve you to be your best self. Mc

 

 

 

 

 

Business Insights, business plan, change, coaching, communication, cooperation, Decision making, fulfillment, Leadership Insights, Performance, Processes, Standards & Practices, Uncategorized

Your Business Needs An Annual Check Up Tool!

[sh_dropcap style=”theme” dropshadow=”true” color=”foreground”][/sh_dropcap] favorite song lyric of mine includes these words—“It’s not where you start, it’s where you finish!” These words keep me centered and focused. Now, we can apply this mantra to our business roadmap.

Virtual Mastermind Project

Benefit from a team booster approach to resolve issues who have to resolve.

We have all been exposed and heard to Standard Operating Procedures (SOP), Policies & Procedures, ISO, and Baldrige Excellence. It does not matter what you call them. What matters is how they are distributed and what assurance you have they are action items.

Consider why it is important to do this?

  • Changing business climate
  • More competitors in the marketplace
  • Catch failing processes and gaps
  • Leadership changes, like succession movement
  • Minimize risks with a solid plan
  • Loss of market share
  • New rules, regulations change quickly
  • Identify where alignment needs adjusting
  • Improve your existing market position
  • Self reflection before customers begin peeling away or want more
  • What is your essential reason? __________________________________________________________________

A mini-version of this is the VMP™ approach. It is an excellent primer to the larger process of strategic planning. Everyone participates. The process reinforces collaboration.

Many companies have annual strategic planning sessions for a three-day off site experience. To make optimized use of this precious time-meaningful and relevant-we must embed the follow-up that must happen to implement the discoveries and decisions that came from the conclave.

Often when a team is so close to the edge, it is difficult for them to see when they step over the side! An objective facilitator is the antidote to keep the event moving and productive.

What does this have to do with processes?

A positive start to your evaluation is to adopt a learner’s mindset. That will require all involved set aside their biases and contribute with fresh eyes and ideas. Begin here:

  1. Set a launch date
  2. Make a big deal about what you’re about to do. Create an identity for participants like T-shirts or caps. People want to belong to the excitement; that their presence makes a difference.
  3. Invite stakeholders from all aspects of the business including outside vendors who may or may not connect directly with your customers.
  4. Be realistic about time frame.
    1. Give the process at least a quarter to take root.
    2. Break the process into segments.
  5. Open the strategic plan:
    1. Assign portions to teams
    2. Have them assess how well each sector ties back to the major plan.
  6. Use the Baldrige Self Assessment as a starting point. There are several reliable assessments. This is the easiest to follow.
    1. ISO is another (more manufacturing oriented) evaluation
    2. https://www.nist.gov/baldrige/self-assessing/improvement-tools
    3. https://www.nist.gov/baldrige/publications/baldrige-excellence-framework

The ultimate benefit is the performance focus and a crystal clear framework.

The assessment provides clarification on business elements that can be overlooked or deliberately ignored until there is a tragic failure. Daily routines and even “best practices” can devolve into a grind. We can lose focus on what and why we are doing what we are doing!

Let me know how it works for you. I’m here to serve.

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