Experience 30-minute Issue Coaching session
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cooperation

Business Insights, business plan, change, coaching, communication, cooperation, Decision making, fulfillment, Leadership Insights, Performance, Processes, Standards & Practices, Uncategorized

Your Business Needs An Annual Check Up Tool!

[sh_dropcap style=”theme” dropshadow=”true” color=”foreground”][/sh_dropcap] favorite song lyric of mine includes these words—“It’s not where you start, it’s where you finish!” These words keep me centered and focused. Now, we can apply this mantra to our business roadmap.

Virtual Mastermind Project

Benefit from a team booster approach to resolve issues who have to resolve.

We have all been exposed and heard to Standard Operating Procedures (SOP), Policies & Procedures, ISO, and Baldrige Excellence. It does not matter what you call them. What matters is how they are distributed and what assurance you have they are action items.

Consider why it is important to do this?

  • Changing business climate
  • More competitors in the marketplace
  • Catch failing processes and gaps
  • Leadership changes, like succession movement
  • Minimize risks with a solid plan
  • Loss of market share
  • New rules, regulations change quickly
  • Identify where alignment needs adjusting
  • Improve your existing market position
  • Self reflection before customers begin peeling away or want more
  • What is your essential reason? __________________________________________________________________

A mini-version of this is the VMP™ approach. It is an excellent primer to the larger process of strategic planning. Everyone participates. The process reinforces collaboration.

Many companies have annual strategic planning sessions for a three-day off site experience. To make optimized use of this precious time-meaningful and relevant-we must embed the follow-up that must happen to implement the discoveries and decisions that came from the conclave.

Often when a team is so close to the edge, it is difficult for them to see when they step over the side! An objective facilitator is the antidote to keep the event moving and productive.

What does this have to do with processes?

A positive start to your evaluation is to adopt a learner’s mindset. That will require all involved set aside their biases and contribute with fresh eyes and ideas. Begin here:

  1. Set a launch date
  2. Make a big deal about what you’re about to do. Create an identity for participants like T-shirts or caps. People want to belong to the excitement; that their presence makes a difference.
  3. Invite stakeholders from all aspects of the business including outside vendors who may or may not connect directly with your customers.
  4. Be realistic about time frame.
    1. Give the process at least a quarter to take root.
    2. Break the process into segments.
  5. Open the strategic plan:
    1. Assign portions to teams
    2. Have them assess how well each sector ties back to the major plan.
  6. Use the Baldrige Self Assessment as a starting point. There are several reliable assessments. This is the easiest to follow.
    1. ISO is another (more manufacturing oriented) evaluation
    2. https://www.nist.gov/baldrige/self-assessing/improvement-tools
    3. https://www.nist.gov/baldrige/publications/baldrige-excellence-framework

The ultimate benefit is the performance focus and a crystal clear framework.

The assessment provides clarification on business elements that can be overlooked or deliberately ignored until there is a tragic failure. Daily routines and even “best practices” can devolve into a grind. We can lose focus on what and why we are doing what we are doing!

Let me know how it works for you. I’m here to serve.

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Behavior, communication, cooperation, Decision making, Risk, Value, Wisdom

When did you last repair someone’s trust?

Confidential coaching positions me to bear witness to a myriad of circumstances. Within that context, I am asked many questions. How to repair trust is one that is poignant.

When trust is bruised or “killed”, there can be a physical feeling of an open wound. We can empathize with some who was betrayed. If remorse sets in, the betrayer also can experience the “wound.”

There are a few ways one can attempt to build trust. Ultimately, we can never account for someone else’s behavior or thinking, just our own. We must not allow others to define who we are and what we stand for. 

Yes, everyone makes mistakes. The gift that will emerge for you is awareness, because you are making an honest effort.

So, what can we do to begin a healing process for broken trust:

  1. Show up with a sincere, contrite apology. Sometimes a written one is powerful so the recipient has time to process it. In few words, be specific about what you are apologizing for, i.e. did you hurt someone’s feelings, was there a misunderstanding, did you strike out at someone?
  2. Own it, and learn from the circumstance no matter how painful. Analyze what you did and how you can avoid such behavior in the future.
  3. Back off. Give the recipient time to absorb your apology. 
  4. In the meantime, do what you say you will do. Talk is cheap.
  5. Actions speak louder than words, so make an effort to support the recipient by being present for him or her.
  6.  Be consistent with your renewed outreach. Be who you say you are.

Ultimately, the apology was delivered. After that, it is up to the injured party to invite you back into their lives. You’ll know. -MC



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Animals, Behavior, cooperation, Shared Leadership

Fairness May Be Genetic—Fill In The Blanks

Recent research shows that social primates have us beat on fairness to each other—Witness today’s horrendous healthcare chaos.

Reported in the journal, Nature, led by Sarah Brosnan and Frans de Waal from Emory University and the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, “The study was built around tokens that the moneys could exchange for so-so cucumbers or highly preferred grapes. As long as two capuchins both got cucumbers for the token, fine. But when one got a grape and other a cucumber, unrest began.” “Refusing a food item of any type is very rare behavior in acapuchin,” Brosnan says.

This finding is reminiscent of what I observed, raising my children 22 months apart, of toddler’s at play. Consider goodie bags at kids’ birthday parties; they check each other’s bags to be sure everyone got the same things!

Considering our proud stance on independent human behavior, the researchers note this simian behavior may be linked to survival and safety.

We, humans, may need to take another look at our behavior, to remember we’re all in this together.

Your coach,

Michelle Cubas

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